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SkillsCast

Keynote: The Web That Never Was

13th September 2017 in London at CodeNode

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​The story of the web is a story about freedom. It's a story about information, about breaking down barriers, about creating new ways for people to communicate, to collaborate, and to share their ideas.

It's also a story of ​optimistic deadlines, broken platforms, strategic U-turns - and some of the ​silliest ideas anybody has ever had in the history of technology. ​The modern web is the result of 25 years of decisions, deadlines, mergers, acquisitions... of programming decisions that made sense at the time (and a few that didn't). A story of luck, serendipity, coincidence, and those tiny turning points, the 'butterfly effect' moments where a single event could have resulted in everything being very, very different.

This talk is all about asking "what if...". You will explore an alternative timeline, a history where Microsoft and Netscape never happened... a web with no HTML, no JavaScript, no MacBooks, no Android phones... a world where everything is unquestionably alien and yet, somehow strangely familiar. So put down your JavaScript frameworks and join as we journey to...

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Keynote: The Web That Never Was

Dylan Beattie

Dylan Beattie is a systems architect, developer, and Microsoft MVP, who has built everything from tiny standalone websites to large-scale distributed systems. He created his first web page in 1992, and he's been building data-driven interactive web applications since the days of Windows NT 4. He's currently the CTO at Skills Matter in London, where he juggles his time between working on their software platform and supporting their conference and community teams. From 2003 to 2018, Dylan worked as webmaster, then IT Manager, and then systems architect at Spotlight (www.spotlight.com), where his first-hand experience of watching an organisation and their codebase evolve over more than a decade provided him with a unique insight into how everything from web standards and API design to Conway's Law and recruitment ends up influencing a company’s code and culture.

SkillsCast

Please log in to watch this conference skillscast.

656334656 640

​The story of the web is a story about freedom. It's a story about information, about breaking down barriers, about creating new ways for people to communicate, to collaborate, and to share their ideas.

It's also a story of ​optimistic deadlines, broken platforms, strategic U-turns - and some of the ​silliest ideas anybody has ever had in the history of technology. ​The modern web is the result of 25 years of decisions, deadlines, mergers, acquisitions... of programming decisions that made sense at the time (and a few that didn't). A story of luck, serendipity, coincidence, and those tiny turning points, the 'butterfly effect' moments where a single event could have resulted in everything being very, very different.

This talk is all about asking "what if...". You will explore an alternative timeline, a history where Microsoft and Netscape never happened... a web with no HTML, no JavaScript, no MacBooks, no Android phones... a world where everything is unquestionably alien and yet, somehow strangely familiar. So put down your JavaScript frameworks and join as we journey to...

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE:

Thanks to our sponsors

About the Speaker

Keynote: The Web That Never Was

Dylan Beattie

Dylan Beattie is a systems architect, developer, and Microsoft MVP, who has built everything from tiny standalone websites to large-scale distributed systems. He created his first web page in 1992, and he's been building data-driven interactive web applications since the days of Windows NT 4. He's currently the CTO at Skills Matter in London, where he juggles his time between working on their software platform and supporting their conference and community teams. From 2003 to 2018, Dylan worked as webmaster, then IT Manager, and then systems architect at Spotlight (www.spotlight.com), where his first-hand experience of watching an organisation and their codebase evolve over more than a decade provided him with a unique insight into how everything from web standards and API design to Conway's Law and recruitment ends up influencing a company’s code and culture.

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