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SkillsCast

Building Cross-platform apps that run in iOS, Android... even Linux

20th September 2018 in London at CodeNode

This SkillsCast was filmed at Linuxing in London September

If you want to develop mobile applications, you have a couple of choices. You can use Swift to write iOS apps and Java for Android apps and end up building your apps twice, of you can use a cross-platform tool and share code between platforms. There are many cross-platform tools and frameworks to choose from, and out of these there is one clear winner – Xamarin.

Xamarin is the only framework that gives you the ability to create native apps with full API access and native UI using a single programming language, sharing most of your code between iOS and Android. No web pages masquerading as native apps, no custom rendered UI, no JavaScript – just native apps built with a native API wrapper and native tooling.

In this session we take a look at Xamarin. We start out with looking at Xamarin Classic, looking the wrappers around the native APIs using Storyboards and Android Layout files, showing how to build an app that runs on both platforms with shared business logic. Then we move onto what is one of the most exciting parts of Xamarin – Xamarin Forms. Xamarin Forms started life as an abstraction layer for apps and UIs, allowing you to define your UI once and share it on iOS and Android, still using native controls but coding your UI layer once. Over time Xamarin Forms has grown due to the ease at which it can be ported over to different platforms. It now supports iOS, Android, Windows, Mac, Tizen TVs and even Linux! You can build an app once and run it on the widest range of platforms possible, and we’ll see this in action with a live coding demo of a Forms app that will be run on most of these platforms.

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Thanks to our sponsors

Building Cross-platform apps that run in iOS, Android... even Linux

Jim Bennett

Jim is a Senior Cloud Developer Advocate working for Microsoft, and his area of speciality is Xamarin apps. Prior to working for Microsoft Jim was a Xamarin and Microsoft MVP, and worked all around the world building desktop and mobile apps using .NET with C# and F#. Jim is also the author of Xamarin In Action from Manning publications.

SkillsCast

If you want to develop mobile applications, you have a couple of choices. You can use Swift to write iOS apps and Java for Android apps and end up building your apps twice, of you can use a cross-platform tool and share code between platforms. There are many cross-platform tools and frameworks to choose from, and out of these there is one clear winner – Xamarin.

Xamarin is the only framework that gives you the ability to create native apps with full API access and native UI using a single programming language, sharing most of your code between iOS and Android. No web pages masquerading as native apps, no custom rendered UI, no JavaScript – just native apps built with a native API wrapper and native tooling.

In this session we take a look at Xamarin. We start out with looking at Xamarin Classic, looking the wrappers around the native APIs using Storyboards and Android Layout files, showing how to build an app that runs on both platforms with shared business logic. Then we move onto what is one of the most exciting parts of Xamarin – Xamarin Forms. Xamarin Forms started life as an abstraction layer for apps and UIs, allowing you to define your UI once and share it on iOS and Android, still using native controls but coding your UI layer once. Over time Xamarin Forms has grown due to the ease at which it can be ported over to different platforms. It now supports iOS, Android, Windows, Mac, Tizen TVs and even Linux! You can build an app once and run it on the widest range of platforms possible, and we’ll see this in action with a live coding demo of a Forms app that will be run on most of these platforms.

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE:

Thanks to our sponsors

About the Speaker

Building Cross-platform apps that run in iOS, Android... even Linux

Jim Bennett

Jim is a Senior Cloud Developer Advocate working for Microsoft, and his area of speciality is Xamarin apps. Prior to working for Microsoft Jim was a Xamarin and Microsoft MVP, and worked all around the world building desktop and mobile apps using .NET with C# and F#. Jim is also the author of Xamarin In Action from Manning publications.