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SkillsCast

Architecture: The Stuff That's Hard to Change

20th March 2019 in London at CodeNode

There are 1 other SkillsCast available from London .NET March 2019

We’ve all heard of the idea of ‘software architecture’. We’ve read books about domain-driven design and event sourcing, we’ve been to conferences and learned about micro services and REST APIs. Some of us remember working with n-tiers and stored procedures... some of us are still using them. But the role of a systems architect is still one of the most misunderstood things about the software development process. What does the architect actually do? If you’re working with a systems architect, what can you expect from them? And if you are a systems architect, what are your team expecting from you? In this talk, Dylan will share his own insights into the idea of architecture as part of a software development process. We’ll explore some popular architectural patterns and processes — and a couple of obscure ones as well — and look at how, and when, you can incorporate those patterns into your own projects. We’ll talk about how the idea of software architecture has changed over time, and share some tips and advice for developers who find themselves working with architecture as part of their role.

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Architecture: The Stuff That's Hard to Change

Dylan Beattie

Dylan Beattie is a systems architect, developer, and Microsoft MVP, who has built everything from tiny standalone websites to large-scale distributed systems. He created his first web page in 1992, and he's been building data-driven interactive web applications since the days of Windows NT 4. He's currently the CTO at Skills Matter in London, where he juggles his time between working on their software platform and supporting their conference and community teams. From 2003 to 2018, Dylan worked as webmaster, then IT Manager, and then systems architect at Spotlight (www.spotlight.com), where his first-hand experience of watching an organisation and its codebase evolve over more than a decade provided him with a unique insight into how everything from web standards and API design to Conway's Law and recruitment ends up influencing a company’s code and culture.

SkillsCast

We’ve all heard of the idea of ‘software architecture’. We’ve read books about domain-driven design and event sourcing, we’ve been to conferences and learned about micro services and REST APIs. Some of us remember working with n-tiers and stored procedures... some of us are still using them. But the role of a systems architect is still one of the most misunderstood things about the software development process. What does the architect actually do? If you’re working with a systems architect, what can you expect from them? And if you are a systems architect, what are your team expecting from you? In this talk, Dylan will share his own insights into the idea of architecture as part of a software development process. We’ll explore some popular architectural patterns and processes — and a couple of obscure ones as well — and look at how, and when, you can incorporate those patterns into your own projects. We’ll talk about how the idea of software architecture has changed over time, and share some tips and advice for developers who find themselves working with architecture as part of their role.

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE:

Thanks to our sponsors

About the Speaker

Architecture: The Stuff That's Hard to Change

Dylan Beattie

Dylan Beattie is a systems architect, developer, and Microsoft MVP, who has built everything from tiny standalone websites to large-scale distributed systems. He created his first web page in 1992, and he's been building data-driven interactive web applications since the days of Windows NT 4. He's currently the CTO at Skills Matter in London, where he juggles his time between working on their software platform and supporting their conference and community teams. From 2003 to 2018, Dylan worked as webmaster, then IT Manager, and then systems architect at Spotlight (www.spotlight.com), where his first-hand experience of watching an organisation and its codebase evolve over more than a decade provided him with a unique insight into how everything from web standards and API design to Conway's Law and recruitment ends up influencing a company’s code and culture.