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SkillsCast

Security and Identity in the .NET World

29th May 2012 in London at Skills Matter

There are 10 other SkillsCasts available from Progressive .NET Tutorials 2012

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As online services and mobile apps take over the world, one of the key challenges facing developers is that of security and identity. How can we trust our users? How can we persuade our users to trust us - and to trust each other? What does it actually mean when you "connect with Facebook" or "log in with Twitter"? How can we deliver great products with great user experience without risking our users' precious data in the process?

In this workshop, we explore various approaches to authentication and ways of verifying your users' identities. We'll look at the practical applications of these techniques.

We'll discuss how patterns like message passing and CQRS can form part of our security strategy. We'll put together some sample applications demonstrating how we can get systems like OpenID, Google, Facebook or Twitter to manage user identity for us, and we'll discover how we can isolate security into a single, reusable module we can re-use across our .NET web applications.

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Thanks to our sponsors

Security and Identity in the .NET World

Dylan Beattie

Dylan Beattie is a systems architect, developer, and Microsoft MVP, who has built everything from tiny standalone websites to large-scale distributed systems. He created his first web page in 1992, and he's been building data-driven interactive web applications since the days of Windows NT 4. He's currently the CTO at Skills Matter in London, where he juggles his time between working on their software platform and supporting their conference and community teams. From 2003 to 2018, Dylan worked as webmaster, then IT Manager, and then systems architect at Spotlight (www.spotlight.com), where his first-hand experience of watching an organisation and its codebase evolve over more than a decade provided him with a unique insight into how everything from web standards and API design to Conway's Law and recruitment ends up influencing a company’s code and culture.

SkillsCast

Please log in to watch this conference skillscast.

299733068 640x360

As online services and mobile apps take over the world, one of the key challenges facing developers is that of security and identity. How can we trust our users? How can we persuade our users to trust us - and to trust each other? What does it actually mean when you "connect with Facebook" or "log in with Twitter"? How can we deliver great products with great user experience without risking our users' precious data in the process?

In this workshop, we explore various approaches to authentication and ways of verifying your users' identities. We'll look at the practical applications of these techniques.

We'll discuss how patterns like message passing and CQRS can form part of our security strategy. We'll put together some sample applications demonstrating how we can get systems like OpenID, Google, Facebook or Twitter to manage user identity for us, and we'll discover how we can isolate security into a single, reusable module we can re-use across our .NET web applications.

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE:

Thanks to our sponsors

About the Speaker

Security and Identity in the .NET World

Dylan Beattie

Dylan Beattie is a systems architect, developer, and Microsoft MVP, who has built everything from tiny standalone websites to large-scale distributed systems. He created his first web page in 1992, and he's been building data-driven interactive web applications since the days of Windows NT 4. He's currently the CTO at Skills Matter in London, where he juggles his time between working on their software platform and supporting their conference and community teams. From 2003 to 2018, Dylan worked as webmaster, then IT Manager, and then systems architect at Spotlight (www.spotlight.com), where his first-hand experience of watching an organisation and its codebase evolve over more than a decade provided him with a unique insight into how everything from web standards and API design to Conway's Law and recruitment ends up influencing a company’s code and culture.